Pathetic Fallacy In Macbeth

1010 Words5 Pages
As said by Albert Einstein, “Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better.” This can be applied to Macbeth by William Shakespeare. Macbeth is a play about a man who is given a prophecy by three witches which encourages him to murder the characters in the play that are preventing him from being king. Throughout the play, nature runs parallel to the action so that readers effectively understand what is happening in the play. This is achieved through pathetic fallacy, plants and animals.

To start, pathetic fallacy is constantly playing a role and works beside the action in the play to convey a certain emotion. For example, at the start of the play the witches meet near a battle field. At this time we hear the Second
…show more content…
To start, plants are used in the scene where the witches are making a vile potion before Macbeth confronts them. This includes, “Root of hemlock, digg’d i’th’dark;” (IV.i.25). This root is poisonous and is known as the insane root. This helps one understand how unconventional it is for a king to be visiting witches. This also reveals the character of the three witches by relating the insane root to how insane and abnormal the witches are. This line also mentions that the root is dug up at night which adds an evil aspect to the scene, and suggests the witches are up to no good. Another example is when the soldiers cut down trees and carry them into battle. The messenger gives this news to Macbeth and he retells the prophecy, “‘Fear not, till Birnam Wood/ Do come to Dunsinane’, and now a wood/ Comes toward Dunsinane.” (V.v.43). After so much death in this play, the trees represent a new beginning that will come with the defeat of Macbeth. The trees represent life and as they are carried towards Dunsinane, it foreshadows what is to come. The reader understands at this moment who will emerge from battle victorious, and that this is the end for Macbeth. Overall, the use of plants helps readers visualize the atmosphere of the play and connect certain emotions to the

More about Pathetic Fallacy In Macbeth

Open Document