Paul A. Cantor's The Apocalyptic Strain In Popular Culture

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Back to the Future of the US For many years Americans have been cherishing the dream of having a loving family with a few children, a decent job, a spacious house and a garage with a car or two, and maybe a dog. In addition, good structured financial, medical, educational, and governmental systems made up a sustainable environment for being happy. This description is what people believe to be an ‘American dream.’ However, what was earlier portrayed in the TV series about typical happy families, nowadays progressed into a wicked understanding of society and the role of people in this society. In his article “The Apocalyptic Strain in Popular Culture: The American Nightmare Becomes the American Dream,” Paul A. Cantor compares and contrasts the basics of once outdated American dream with the TV shows that supply the new understanding of what Americans lack to feel content. The author states that having exposed the characters to highly extreme conditions and casualties, the real value of a human life and all the excitement around the things that make up the happiness of…show more content…
Given series show different post-technocratic era where ordinary people survive and interact with each other and the hostile environment to reveal their true nature and the real value of the things needed for everyday survival and living as well as new understanding of being secure and content. People who are tired of endless pursuit of wealth which they believe can give them happiness make up the target audience. The audience is supposed to open its eyes to the reality that the list of things to buy and loans they have to pay out do not cost anything in different circumstances. The essay provides an in-depth analysis of the series with reference to other sources as well as the author succeeds to convey the idea through consistency of ideas, including self explanatory examples, and using rhetorical

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