Electric Shocks: A Case Study

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"I thought I would die," says Kim Pace who for six months lost more than 30 kilograms, and until then the normal body structure.

She was not talking about diet nor of eating disorders - but the fear of stabbing pain on the left side of his face every time he opened his mouth.

No tooth brushing is not an option because the slightest touch driven by waves of unbearable pain, which Pace describes as electric shocks. Analgesics and even morphine would provide relief only briefly.

Unable to work, Pace first took sick leave and then resigned in the workplace financial consultant bank at the age of 59 years.

The first half of 2012, the man has spent visiting various specialists in Pennsylvania and asking them for help. They had no way to agree
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Doctors diagnose heartburn.

A few days later, because of severe pain in the stomach, established a new diagnosis - an inflammation of the gallbladder, common in diabetics. He was sent to surgery to remove the organ that has stopped working.

In the meantime, the pain in his face from baking moved to sense a series of electric shocks, which continued to be a stable symptom.

Having nothing concrete has been found as the cause, it is easier to be patient declared insane.

The pace soon there was nothing he could eat. The wife would put peanut butter on a spoon or a ready puree the soup, but the time and it has become difficult to eat.

The couple consulted a multitude of specialist - a gastroenterologist, endocrinologist, cardiologist ... One day the yogi wife Carol described the symptoms of members of the group, a woman said her mother - which is a condition diagnosed trigeminal neuralgia, specific for muscle spasm caused by pain - have similar health problems.

It is a non-specific pain, tied for fifth cranial or trigeminal nerve. Some of the causes of the pressure vessel to the nerve injury during sinus surgery occurs in multiple sclerosis, certain tumors ... The disease is twice as prevalent in women as in men older than 50

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