People Will Follow A Tradition In Shirley Jackson's The Lottery

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In Shirley Jackson's “The Lottery”, the theme is that people will follow a tradition for no reason whatsoever sometimes. I will explain why I think this is the theme in my story through 3 paragraphs. I will talk about the key details that the author (Shirley Jackson) gives throughout the story. I will then explain why all the key details connect to theme that I stated in the text. In the last paragraph I will combine my thinking into one paragraph about the beginning middle and end of the book. After I talk about all of the things that I talk about through my text. I will then write a conclusion about what I thought about the book and restating the theme. In the book “The Lottery By Shirley Jackson” it talks about the theme a lot. The theme in this story is that people will…show more content…
I think this because from first page to the last the author states that they had lost the black box and the people of the village had to make a new one which would probably offset the original tradition. During the middle of the book I think because there are many instances that happen where it shows that people are doing this for know reason. It shows this when there are people talking about that how other towns had stopped doing the ritual or tradition. There where a los fights between younger and older people “Old Man Warner snorted. "Pack of crazy fools," he said. "Listening to the young folks, nothing's good enough for them. Next thing you know, they'll be wanting to go back to living in caves” where the older people said this is write and the younger said it wasn't. Another time it shows this is when everybody is scared of the FAKE black box. I think that the theme that people will follow a tradition for no reason at the end because when they are stoning Tessie Hutchinson to death because she had the black dot on her paper she said "It isn't fair, it isn't right,’ Mrs. Hutchinson screamed, and then they were upon

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