Person Centered Practice

1689 Words7 Pages
Person-centred practice for older people is treatment and care provided by health services that places the person at the centre of their own care and considers the needs of the older people's carers. It is also known as: person-centred care, patient-centred care or client-centred care. The principles of person-centred practice: Getting to know the resident as a person: health care workers need to get to know the person beyond the diagnosis and build relationships with them. Sharing of power and responsibility: respecting preferences and treating residents as partners in setting goals, planning care and making decisions about care, treatment or outcomes. Accessibility and flexibility: meeting the individual resident’s needs by being sensitive…show more content…
I always encourage my service users to be involved in decision making and participate in activities they are have interest in. There are different ways in which my service users can be empowered and encouraged. The importance of service users interacting with the community and having social contact with friends and relationships with the wider community. I continue to encourage and support service users with their involvement in the community and their contribution is paramount. When service users maintain social contact, it helps them be valued and boost motivation and self-esteem. We use Skills Match which is a model of support that inspires individuals that have mental health issues to make a strategy for their spare time, with the support from staff and families what reassures the individuals to participate in activities they wish which will help in their daily living. It helps to empower and motivate service users, instead of caring we are supporting and working together to achieve positive…show more content…
They have an involvement in how they want to be cared for and aspects that matter to them. The benefits of active participation are alienated into two categories which are primary benefits and secondary benefits. Primary benefits include: Individuals have a greater independence and autonomy. It allows individuals to have an opportunity to have a say in health and social care setting and discuss matters that matter to them. Have increased opportunities for social contact and interpersonal relationships. Service users are encouraged in their involvement and their contribution. When individuals are involved in the community they can progress and are aware of the opportunities and positive outcomes. Opportunities are improved for learning and developing of constructive skills, knowledge, education and employment. Boost in self-confidence, self-esteem, self-belief, motivation and improved well-being. Secondary benefits can be designated as benefits that transpire when actively participating but they are not the direct aim of active
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