Personal Identity And Social Identity

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According to (Hourigan, 2016) there are two different types of identity, personal identity and social identity. Personal identity “concerns the parts of yourself that mark you as unique, an individual distinct from everyone else”. Social identity “concerns the part of your identity that are governed by society and other groups”. (Hourigan, 2016) You do not choose the majority of these characteristics, for example being Irish, being raised a certain religion or your sex but these help shape a person’s social identity. Gender is defined as “The state of being male or female typically used with reference to social and cultural differences rather than biological ones”. (English Oxford Living Dictionaries, 2016) It is important to recognize…show more content…
We get little choice at this age as we learn our ‘sex-roles’ mainly through primary socialisation, watching and being influenced by our parents and family. (Hammond, et al., 2015) The baby girl is wrapped in pink and the boy in blue, the boy gets tractors and drums for Christmas while the girl gets dolls and prams, automatically suggesting a mothering role for the girl and a working role for the boy. This process happens between the ages of 0-6 (Hourigan, 2016). As children grow older most of them learn and incorporate expected gender characteristics and attitudes such as, acting tough and “manly” or putting on makeup and acting “properly”. (McDonald, 2009). This reflects the way many young children begin to act in society. Girls are expected to have empathy and to be caring, whereas boys are “supposed” to be emotionally distant, independent and strong. (Chodorow, 1978) They way in which we are moulded and shaped as children, depending on our sex and thus gender, impacts on our identity…show more content…
In these countries, there is no “gender parity”, with “80 per cent of its out-of-school girls are unlikely to ever start school compared to 16 per cent of its out-of-school boys”. Providing education for women can help break the poverty cycle, as educated women are less likely to get married at a young age and more likely to send their children to school. (UNICEF, 2015) Education for these women would have a huge positive impact on their identity as they would get the chance to better themselves and would also ultimately impact the identity of their children. It is evident also, in many of these countries that by receiving an education men view themselves as superior to women and are more likely to discount women of having any value. (McDonald,
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