Personal Narrative: Level 5 Gymnast

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When I was 7 my only goal was to be a level 5 gymnast so I could compete with the “big girls”. I worked my butt off in the gym 6 hours a week to achieve this goal. I was in the best shape i 've ever been in and was having the time of my life. Shortly after finally getting there my coach stopped taking us to competitions, and I was restricted to going to the gym only one hour a week. Shortly after I had lost most of my strength and skills and was devastated. I believe the journey is more important than the destination because you have to go through the journey to get to the destination, you may not reach the goal but you 've had accomplishments along the way, and the goal may not be exactly what you thought you wanted. You have…show more content…
In my first year of gymnastics I learned tons of new skills and built up my strength because I knew I needed to be able to keep up with others on the level. At the end of the first year I learned I had not achieved all of the requirements to level up, I was crushed, but I learned the things I would need to accomplish to be able to move up the next year. Being able to fail taught me to look at the positives from the journey and learn from them. Some people may argue that the destination is more important than the journey because it feels good to achieve a goal. I agree with it feeling good to achieve a goal but you can’t forget how you got there. That’s what some people forget, they forget that they had to put in work to achieve their goal. They tend to forget the things they’ve learned along the way. The journey is more important because it’s what you learn from the most and it actually gets you to where you want to be. I believe the journey is more important than the destination because you have to go through the journey to get to the destination, you may not reach the goal but you 've had accomplishments along the way, and the goal may not be exactly what you thought you wanted. In conclusion, your accomplishments and the things you’ve learned are more important than the outcome of
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