Importance Of Cloning

731 Words3 Pages
Within the last 150 years, science has given birth to telephones, television, new medical practices, nuclear weapons, and the internet, yet humans are rapacious and desire more from themselves. Because of this, mankind has found ways to consistently revolutionize every aspect of each subject and continue to do so as time progresses. Until recently, cloning was a concept taken from science-fiction but became reality in 1996 when Dolly, the sheep, was successfully cloned. From her birth, the scientific community sparked debates over the legality of cloning, and one specific debate was whether cloning oneself should be legal, along with downloading memories from the previous host. Although the technology may be available in the future, while assuming…show more content…
Petroleum oil is a driving force of today's world since it is used in nearly every appliance through direct or indirect application. Ignoring war, petroleum provides large complications because it is a staple of the world's trade for its use as fuel or and production of plastics. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, "the global supply of crude oils... is expected to be adequate to meet the world's demand for liquid fuels through 2050." Meaning, given the ratio of oil production to oil consumption, the world can run on fossil fuels until 2050, but if cloning were to be introduced on an international scale, the world's population would rise exponentially higher by cutting down, if not eliminating, the rate of…show more content…
On average, adults drink about 58 gallons of water per, excluding all other liquids which water is the base for, such as juices and sodas. Around two-thirds of the planet is covered in water, but only two and a half percent of that water is fresh, yet only one percent is drinkable because most is trapped in either glaciers or underground. To further limit water being consumed by humans, about seventy percent of freshwater is used for agricultural purposes worldwide. In an article published by BBC news and written by Tim Smedley, he says "Water demand globally is projected to increase by 55% between 2000 and 2055." As shown, water is a necessary to maintain life on Earth, but climate change and population growth strain the Earth's supply of water. Immortality would only strain the water usage further since water is being used faster than it can be replenished in multiple areas around the world. An example being California, where, as said in the article, the longest drought in over 1000 years took place between 2011 and 2016. Given that water is a nonrenewable resource, increasing population would hasten the depletion of the planet's reservoirs and springs, directly causing the end to all life on Earth
Open Document