Private Schools Vs. Public Schools

1019 Words5 Pages
The United States of America professes ideals of equality, and above all, freedom, as is so ardently protected in its Constitution. In regards to this, the question of whether or not government has the right to enforce strict laws on both public and private campuses is debated upon. As it is, public universities, despite its expensive cost, are funded by way of the public through governmental means. For this reason, government should indeed have an incentive towards securing an accessible education to the entire population with public schooling. Private schools, however, are under no obligation to be put under such scrutiny. Nonetheless, stringent government legislature on diversity, regardless of the method of school funding, would only serve…show more content…
Notably so, forceful government initiative in maintaining diversity among schools of higher education would lead to the mandating of a specific quota for a diverse student body, therein increasing biased admissions disregarding academic skill to satisfy requirements. Such a conception would only serve to hinder the very individuals that the government is attempting to help, as is explained in Richard H. Sander’s study, wherein affirmative action and its implications on black law students were observed. It was revealed that individuals become increasingly susceptible to “drop[ping] out and fail[ing]” due to such persons being “in over their heads academically” (Source B). Unprepared students lacking the necessary skills are admitted and overwhelmed,…show more content…
Such an example is David Horowitz, as he delineates in his article the lack of clear policies on the matter, referencing the University of Colorado, where its “guidelines [...] [do] not provide sufficient protection for students unlikely to visit it” (Source D). While Horowitz raises legitimate concern from prior experiences, his insistence on stricter policies are not the solution, and would instead bring about more complications, more so on the student’s view on the matter. As Ann Marie Bahr supplements through anecdotal evidence, she asserts that “students do not have the academic maturity” to employ its use, detailing on the various instances where students felt they had justification for taking offense at her teaching methodology and beliefs because of David Horowitz’ very own “Academic Bill of Rights” (Source H?). By misinterpreting the reason for such measures, they exploit its terms and fail to realize the detriment to their education. Academically immature students risk blinding themselves towards other perspectives and potentially become embedded with a form of self-superiority over their own stance. This not only applies itself to intellectual diversity, but extends to all other forms of diversity as well. Although one’s background and opinions hold importance, they must not jeopardize
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