Persuasiveness In Frankenstein

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The way you speak says a lot about you. Victor created his creature in a manner that even he was afraid of it and ran off, so he never had the opportunity to show him how to speak. However, the monster learned to speak and act in a very proper manner. The eloquence and persuasiveness make it easier as a reader to sympathise with Victor’s creation because you learn he’s not evil, has humane characteristics, and forget he’s a monster. Rejected by his creator, the monster seeks shelter, however, he is disoriented and with the basic concepts that will allow him to survive. He is on his own in the wilderness where he finds a shed that is neighboring a cottage to a european family. He watches them and learns their language. He grows very fond of this family, even though, they have no idea of his existence. The monster believes these people “are the most excellent creatures in the world” and builds courage to speak to the father who is blind. The father notices the eloquence in his speech and says “there is something in your words that persuade me that you are sincere,” to the monster, which demonstrate he truly wants to be accepted and genuinely cares for these folks. At the arrival to the cottage the monster notices this family is in poverty. The brother, Felix, had great compassion for his sister, Agata, and made sure to take of her. Felix…show more content…
It pays more to see a creature that is unwitty and feels no pain than to show one that is bonded with a human. Not even giving him a name and just calling him a monster creates this image that he is in no way similar to us and could be classified as an animal. Mary Shelley created an intellectual monster to demonstrate how we as humans aren’t so different as the monster we create. A poised monster wouldn’t intrigue you as much as an intellectual monster that can’t vouch for his
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