Plagiarism In Academic Literature

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Sample comparative summary/synthesis

“LIMITING PLAGIARISM IN EFL WRITING CLASSROOMS” AND
“YOUR OWN THOUGHTS IN YOUR OWN WORDS”:
A COMPARATIVE SYNTHESIS

Not until recently has the Western concept “plagiarism” become familiar to Asian academic culture in general and Vietnamese academic culture in particular. What it means by “plagiarism”, what causes plagiarism among EFL learners and how to limit plagiarism in EFL writing classrooms are currently the questions of serious concern among teachers of academic writing in different countries. In the two articles “Limiting Plagiarism in EFL Writing Classrooms” by Darunee Dujsik in THAITESOL BULLETIN Volume 15/2 August 2002 and “Your Own Thoughts in Your Own Words” by Jane Sherman in ELT Journal Volume 46/2 April 1992, this matter is interestingly investigated in Thailand and Italy respectively. The facts from these two countries may, to great extent, be the case in Vietnam.
To start with, what is “plagiarism” and what are the symptoms of plagiarism? According to Leonhard (1999, as cited in Dujsik (2002:?): “Plagiarism is a form of cheating that involves borrowing or paraphrasing ideas from another person without acknowledging the source.” Dujsik adds that there exist two types of plagiarists – intentional and unintentional. Intentional plagiarists are those who duplicate other students’ papers to make them their own. Unintentional plagiarists, whereas, write the papers themselves but lack proper citation. Sherman (1992), on the
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