Plato's Theory Of Knowledge Analysis

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Plato (429 – 347 B.C.E.) starts his quest for knowledge by asking, what is real in things? (i.e. the truth). He ulrimetly comes to the conclusion that what we believe to be the real world or what we see with our eyes is not real but merely an imitation or appearance of the truth. This world is just a shadow, a reflection of an idea, which can be found in the world of ideas, and is to be reached by rational thinking. He explains this through his allegory of the cave. This methaphor fundamentally is attempting to address the questions; what is the true world and what is just an appearance of the true world? Is there a distinction between belief and knowledge? Is there a possibility of true knowledge? Plato uses his allegory of the…show more content…
He felt that all humans were exposed to two worlds at once. Firstly, there was the world we see around us (appearance). The everyday world which changes constantly. Plato believed that this is not the real world. He suggested that there is another world. A real world, unchanged, called the realm of idea. He uses the allegory of the cave to illustrate his idea. He wanted to show that the world is merely an illusion of the truth. Our worls, is just an imperfect shadow of the true, unchanged, perfect realm of idea, where true knowledge exists. He felt humanity would only see this world if we stepped out of the darkness of our world of appearance and blind belief (the cave) and into the light of the true world of true knowledge. Plato saw himself as an escaped prisoner who stepped out into the light first to show us the true reality of our world. He thus believed that everything that the senses tell us about cannot be believed. Every tree, apple, table, etc exists in our worls merely as a shadow of the perfect idea that exists in the realm of the…show more content…
Here Plato introduces the allegory of the cave (Republic, 514 -519c) the allegory describes a cave inhabited by prisoners. For as long as they can remember they have been in chains facing the wall, their backs turned to the cave entrance. A fire burns behind them casting shadows on the wall. To the prisoners, these shadows are real. To them, truth is the shadows of the of the of the figures since this is the only reality of which they are aware. He believes that seeing is not enough. One must have knowledge as well in order to interpret what one
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