Plato's Theory Of Justice

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Globalization as we know is nothing but a mental phenomenon, which is both external to individual as well as experienced internally. For example, a person may feel the early symptoms of globalization in form of nostalgic lapse. We might go to a particular place, often quite a time and seeing the changed surroundings, a thought occurs “ this place used to be different before.” The words “different before” depicts a person has experienced a part of globalization whereby he sees how a place developed rapidly to which he had some emotional connectivity. Consciousness if the time we experience in space. Due to increase in the means of movement, our consciousness has expanded, shrinking the space around. Justice according to old notion is based…show more content…
He comprehended that all the theories proposed by Thrasymachus, Socrates and other has one common component. The common component was that all these considered justice as an external force that was kind of an achievement that needs to be carried out for the survival in the habitat. According to him, it is not a relationship of a superior and inferior, whereby an inferior follows or complies by the laws set by the superior, not does justice is born out of fear. Rather the person performs such duty as the nature has casted over him for a specific purpose. He states that justice is done when a human being wishes to do a duty, without under any fear. His theory of justice says that justice is craft performance. And for this technique is needed to perfect the skill which is attached with such craft. Craft is the skillset and it should be performed diligently. Thus, justice would mean, every person who is responsible to deliver justice should be obliged to perform his craft properly and eliminate any person, who within it does alien things, to harmonize the whole process. Craft justice is not instrumental to justice, it is justice in itself. Therefore, Plato says that the substance of law will not change only the approach will change. We can consider his theory as a kind of harmony between the individual being and the state as a whole. He viewed justice as an idea, an attribute of the mind, which itself in a…show more content…
In the first approach, it describes a conduct, which conforms to an established rule of conduct that also means a set of rules or laws. This being said, justice denotes, a moral disposition, which makes a man to things, which are just. It is mainly an application of certain rules, which is called virtue of righteousness or of moral justice. It is a virtue, which is applied over others, and the whole of virtue needs to be employed and not a part of it. He believed in the importance of teleology, which is the study of ends, and all other things being claimed is considered as ends. The other aspect of his theory states justice as fairness or lawfulness. Law encourages people to perform nobly. He draws a distinction between virtue and justice; the former being one’s moral state and latter being the relation one holds with the society. He has divided justice into two parts, particular justice and general justice. The former states that a just society helps a human to perform righteously and live the good life, whereas, the latter states justice is nothing but giving people according to what they actually
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