Poem 1: Chesapeake And Ohio Railroad's Location

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Claim 1: Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad’s location, and its access to coal rich areas. The Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad tracks ran through cities such as Richmond, Buffalo, Chicago, Milwaukee, and Louisville, all the way to the Ohio River. Totaling 405 miles of railroad tracks. Having access to these cities provided additional revenue from numerous other industries such as lumber, tourism and agriculture. Additionally, C&O provided access to the Atlantic Ocean and Appalachian Mountains. With this direct connection, C&O was able to transport cargo not just domestically but also provided access to ports allowing its cargo to be exported internationally. This allowed Chesapeake and Ohio to have a foot in both domestic and international markets …show more content…

C&O had an advantage when it came to transportation of coal to the East. Due to the railroads' close proximity to the coal mines it helped to reduce transportation costs and allowed it to transport large amounts of coal for less overall operational costs. Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad foundation was built through coal fields in West Virginia. Totaling to 428 miles. Transportation of coal was seamless as they were able to carry coal to Richmond, load it onto ships that would travel downstream Shockoe Creek. This led to an increase in profitability. With shortened transportation fuel and operating costs decrease. C&O total operating costs were $133,042,174.28. Another element that was key to Chesapeake and Ohio’s success was the Blue Ridge tunnel. The tunnel was designed by Claudius Crozet. The tunnel totaled 4,236 feet, allowing the trains to go through the mountains, despite the previous …show more content…

Over the course of 1923 to 1927 as seen in figure number 6 the total passengers notably decreased. Chesapeake and Ohio started off with a total of 7,430,827 passengers in 1923. Then in 1924 that number of passengers decreased to 6,845,756 losing a total of 585,071 passengers from the previous year. In 1925 the number of passengers decreased to 5,811,872 losing a total of 1,033,884 passengers from the previous year. From 1926 the number of passengers dropped even lower to 5,370,176 total passengers served, losing a total of 441,696 passengers from the previous year. The final year decreased to a total of 5,127,188 passengers, losing a total of 242,988 from the previous year. Over the course of five years Chesapeake and Ohio railroad lost a total 2,060,651passengers

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