Poe's Anger In The Tell-Tale Heart By Edgar Allan Poe

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Poe’s Anger “So you think I am mad? A madman cannot plan,” so wrote Edgar Allan Poe in “The Tell-Tale Heart.” Poe is known to be the “Father of the Detective Story,” for his mysterious horror short stories and poems he made in the 1800’s (“Edgar Allan Poe”). On January 19, 1809, Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston, Massachusetts to his parents Elizabeth Arnold Poe and David Poe Jr. However, Poe’s dad left him and his mother, and Poe’s mother died of tuberculosis when he was only three. He was then adopted by John and Frances Valentine Allan in Richmond, Virginia. Allan did not wish for Poe to continue in his literary skills. In 1826, Poe went to the University of Virginia, but since he didn’t have enough money, Poe went into debt and had to…show more content…
Despite being a critic and writer, Edgar Allan Poe still had a love connection with his 13 year old cousin,Virginia, whom he married in 1836. However, it did not last long because Virginia died in 1847 from tuberculosis. According to Bio.com, Poe suffered from the loss of his wife, poor health, and money issues. Poe was last seen on October 7, 1949 in the hospital, which he supposedly states, “Lord, help my poor soul,” (“Edgar Allan Poe”). In an addition, no one really knows how he died some say alcoholism, others say rabies, epilepsy, or carbon monoxide, but everyone will remember his works. Many of his short stories are collected in, Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque. Poe also published the short story “The Cask of Amontillado”; starts out as a guy name Montresor who wants to get revenge from a guy name Fortunato who put down him. Montresor ends up burying Fortunato alive. Poe published a lot of short stories and poems that related to loss of innocence. The stories “The Black Cat,” “The Raven,” and “The Tall-Tale Heart,” and the poem Annabel Lee, all share the theme loss of innocence. Poe’s work shows that loss of innocence leads to bad decisions…show more content…
In one of his poems, “The Raven,” the speaker suffers the loss of a girl name Lenore. “Respite-respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore!” (4). In this line, the narrator states how he respite and nepenthe, which means he is feeling a short period of relief of grief from his loss of Lenore. In another one of Poe’s poems “Annabel Lee,” the speaker is suffering from the loss of his wife Annabel Lee. “Went envying her and me-/Yes!-that was the reason (as all men know, In this kingdom by the sea)/That the wind came out of the cloud by night,/Chilling and Killing my Annabel Lee” (5). In this line he blames the angels and the wind for killing his Annabel Lee. The final example in Poe’s work is from “Spirit of the Dead,” the speaker is explaining how people try to escape death. “Now are visions ne’er to vanish; From thy spirit shall pass. No more, like dew-drop from the grass...” (4). In this stanza the speaker wants to emphasize how people feel when they are dying. Death in Edgar Allan Poe’s work, leads to loss of innocence throughout the stories. In Poe’s work, death, the most extreme loss of innocence, leads Poe’s characters to feel guilt. For instance, in the “Tell-Tale Heart,” the speaker relieves his guilt by confessing to what he did: I was suffering more than I could bear, from their smiles, and from that sound. Louder, Louder, louder! Suddenly I could bear it no longer. I pointed at the
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