Polarism In The Canto

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‘The transient joy’ and ‘the timeless sea of tears’, ‘the battle’ and ‘the victory’, ‘the walking toil’, ‘the incoherent sleep’, all these stages show the central idea of Savitri’s mind that she now enters into the eternal Supreme Consciousness. The structural pattern of the Canto, begins with the extreme polarities: the earthly world of matter ruled by the laws of nature and, on the other, the world of the living soul. The Canto is highly experiential and existential, comprising the entire gamut of human experience ranging from the earthly to the astral. Philosophy and philosophizing is not in abstraction but grows in relation to the world, and emanates from the earthly life in the world. That is why a passing reference is made to the earthly…show more content…
The point is, Death does not out rightly reject God. The only way to find Him, he says, is by renouncing the world (as many sects and sages opine). This does not necessarily mean he champions the path of renunciation, or considers all things on earth as Maya ‘illusion’. There is no denial of the truth that “the world is too much with us, /The world is a myth that happened to come true” (10.4.166). The Lord of Death is the adherent and the advocate of the ground realities of life. Human world and God’s world (he argues), are intractable. They are altogether two separate entities. No relation, whatsoever, is there between the two. The unreceptive nature of man-the limitation of the human mind, is largely responsible for this impasse, “If Mind is all, renounce the hope of bliss /For Mind can never touch the body of Truth” (10.4.172-173). It is also true that man can attain true peace only when he takes his mind away from the worldly activities. Only when he sets life free, he will find happiness. There is certain justification in his argument: it is only by renouncing life and mind, Self can be attained. The Voice or the…show more content…
Not on earth but after leaving the earth, if there is a heaven, where there is no grief, Savitri should seek joy there. There is no concept of love in Death’s domain. “Forgetting love means forgetting Satyavan” (Savitri 10.4.229). Death is antipodal to Savitri in his standpoint, at least initially, in the beginning. By not condescending, and by rejecting his boons, “Surely thy boons are greater since thou art He!” (10.4.243). The general myth is, pleased by Savitri’s virtuous steadfastness and perseverance, Yama or the Lord of Death grants her three boons, and also returns her the life of Satyavan. But Sri Aurobindo presents her as the paradigm of the Divine. For, she alone has a separate, independent identity, and never even for a moment, shows acceptance of his authority or submission to his power. Later, the paradigm itself becomes Divine. Her transformation is as much the avatric ‘incarnated’ descendence, as the revelation. Suggestive of the truth that what is human is Divine. All dichotomies come to an end, as all contraries lead to and prepare for the final harmony. Savitri establishes her supremacy over Death and proves her independence from him as
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