Police Corruption Theory

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Chapter 9: Theoretical Insight into Corruption Social Learning Theory There have been numerous attempts to understanding police corruption. With no clear explanation through theories, police corruption can be associated with previous behavior models throughout the philosophical discipline. One of the most applicable concepts is the Social Learning Theory presented by Akers. Akers’ theory is presented as a contemporary spin from the differential association theory that implies subcultures and peer groups facilitate deviant behavior through peer influence (Alpert & Dunham, 1997). Akers’ social learning theory positions itself that peer association, attitudes, reinforcements, and modeling are the predicative relationship to delinquency and…show more content…
This model combines two perspectives of conflict theory and symbolic interaction theory. In a sense, this theory expresses deviance as a society process where some people label others as deviant. It emphasizes precisely that deviance is relative - meaning it is not until a marker is given to someone in a position such as law officers that the person becomes deviant. Make sense? Let’s break this down a little more. Think about the kid in school who was labeled the “bad kid”. He in a sense was not a bad kid, as he most likely had ADHD which was not diagnosed during that time. The kid acts up and gets in trouble as a means of gaining attention and living up to the part of the label. What IF he was labeled a good kid, would the behaviors changed? As a child who got in trouble throughout the teen years. Perhaps, got in trouble with the court system a time or two. Most likely this person is not a bad seed, however, if he is labeled a criminal, the intrinsic attitude it to be the label. Understand now? A police officer who goes to work for a very politically drawn and “corrupt” division of the police department – in time the label that carried on with the job or sector, may actually hinder that officer from doing his or her job…show more content…
Felson and Cohen consider the crime is typical and it depends on the opportunities (Felson & Cohen, 1990). In this concept, the rationality of wanting more rather than less” is widely used as an assumption of the behavior of individuals. Further, it involves seeking the most cost-effective means to achieve the objective without reflecting on the worthiness of that goal, or the ethical consideration of achieving the goal. The "rationality" described by a lucid optimal theory is different from the idiomatic and most logical use of the word. Typically, "rationality" means "sane" or "in a thoughtful clear-headed manner. The rational choice theory defines rational only to say that an individual acts as if balancing costs against benefits to arrive at action that maximizes personal advantage. In rational choice theory, all decisions, crazy or sane, are postulated as mimicking such a "rational" process. Thus the rationality is seen as a property of patterns of choices, rather than of individual choices. This becomes tricky because every person’s rational choice is not the same nor could it be measured successfully with validity and reliability. The rationale we choose throughout every decision making process is a reflection of our own unique values and cultural influences. Therefore, in the means of corruption, the rational choice that officer’s make are those in some
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