Political Philosophy And Political Philosophy

1724 Words7 Pages
Political science and political philosophy are two unique philosophies of different eras that review and study the political behaviors and values. Political philosophy is regarded as an ancient concept which followed back to Socrates who encouraged partisanship in politics. Moving to the political science, it is a modern study of political behavior that supports the non-partisanship. Political scientists are not interested in political argues like political philosophers, because they want to deal with facts as they believe. But such debates will not have solutions. The political philosophy mostly concentrates on building up the best regime while the political scientists have developed several theories that are intended to political civil arguments…show more content…
Both political philosophy and political theory can be comprehended by tracing the origin. Socrates (470-399 B.C.) was the first trace of political philosophy, which Socrates goes ahead to state the justice. For whatever reason, Socrates has not written anything, but his students Plato (c.427-347 B.C.) and Xenophon (c. 430- c. 350 B.C.) recorded his life and speech. Evidence of natural justice lays in anger of people when they feel they unjustly treated. In Plato’s Republic, Socrates represents two types of anger, the guardian who is angry, but do not think about the reason of the matter and the angry philosopher consider the reason of the matter. The existence of natural justice justifies the partisanship since partisans have a contention to make, have faith in justice, and mean well in their argument. Partisanship suggests that individuals can select how to live regarding to their best interest. To Socrates, the best regime is ruled by somebody who knows…show more content…
The ancient is seeking the good life, right order and supporting virtue while the modern philosophers are concerned with peace and order. The moderns’ numerous theories undermine the purpose of government and reduce politics to power. Hobbes preserves that the purpose of the government is to keep up peace and order. In addition, he suggests the ruler should be a sovereign who has supreme power, which is a power of the people. The state of nature creates a paradox where people move from complete liberation to an wholly sovereign submission. Justice has no place in the state of nature where people are led or ruled by fear to obey. Modern philosophers command their citizens to give up their freedoms and right of liberty, which is an inalienable natural right, to the collective
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