Political Writings Of Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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Jean-Jacques Rousseau, one of the most important names in the world of French thought and literature, came to the world on June 28, 1712 in Geneva, Switzerland Growing up with religious education, Rousseau worked with music and taught music in his first youth. Again these years, Rousseau made his living by making translations. On the days of his interpreting, Rousseau had the opportunity to see many cities of Italy, France and Switzerland. However, these years, Rousseau's writings are forbidden in the country. After this ban, Scottish thinker David Hume went to Great Britain on the invitation. Having stayed here for a while, Rousseau accepted Calvinism, a denomination that passed from England to Switzerland to Neuchatel, where it rejected the…show more content…
Rousseau, who lived for some time as a calvinist, later became a Catholic believer, but after a while he became a Calvinist again. Rousseau passed away on July 2, 1778 in France-Ermenonville. Throughout his 66-year career, Jean-Jacques Rousseau has been regarded as one of the world's most important writers and philosophers by his literary works, as well as his philosophical ideas and political theories. Rousseau's state understanding is clearly revolutionary. According to him, the state is based on the authoritarian sovereignty - as it is in the classical defense of divine favor - monarchical sovereignty - and in the authoritarian sovereignty - which Hobbes is in Leviafhan - which is a lot of free from hegemony, on the contrary to the free union of the citizens. According to Rousseau, only such domination is prevalent . Contractual thought and the doctrine of sovereignty were developed during the period of religious wars and civil wars in Europe. They are the answer to the weaknesses of the social and political institutions that characterize this age, to unbridled authority, to wars and social miseries. According to him, sovereignty is indivisible and…show more content…
Rousseau's understanding of democracy is often described as the theory of identity in the sense of the continuing identity of sovereigns with sovereigns. However, it is precisely the skepticism of Rousseau that the sovereignty of these sovereigns and the institutional connection of the legislature and the executive are so connected. Finally, the external political and geopolitical conditions must be appropriate for democracy: for Rousseau, democracy is a form of state that fits the smaller and poorer states, but as a rule these states are connected to other great states in economic and military terms. Rousseau was a republican. His ideal state - historically, the Republic of Rome and authoritatively ruled Sparta, and in the meantime, in a small space, a morally perfect republic, in particular the Corsican, as a general ideal form of government for him as the "last classical utopian" It was a republic. Particularly based on the work of the Social Contract, this republic includes a strong basic democratic content and a radical democratic doctrine of popular
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