Pooh And Piglet Analysis

474 Words2 Pages
As Pooh walks alongside his little friend, Piglet, Pooh sweetly remarks, “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day so I never have to live without you” (Milne). Sometimes the most unlikely individuals turn into the dearest of friends. Two fuzzy friends illuminate this idea perfectly: A.A. Milne’s beloved Winne the Pooh and Piglet. Clearly, Pooh, a simple bear stuffed with fluff, seems the most unlikely companion for tiny, timid Piglet. However, they treasure their friendship. Their story pictures a true, genuine friendship. Thus, a genuine friendship consists of two individuals with relational fidelity, similar values, and mutual edification.

To begin, a genuine friendship consists of two individuals with relational fidelity. From the outside, people often appear sincere and committed to their friendships. They enjoy each other’s company and embarking on adventures together. Sadly, many of these friendships will
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If two people have opposing values, their actions and interests will differ, as well. This occurs because values are the foundation of each individual personality. Thus, each person will enjoy other’s company more fully if they share the same worldview. Overall, values embed themselves deep in a person’s heart. So, when the principles in the hearts of two people match, a true connection occurs.

Furthermore, a genuine friendship consists of two individuals providing mutual edification. True friends encourage each other in wholesome ways. The test of true friendship occurs when one friend has the opportunity to exhort the other. A shallow friend down-plays the importance, while a true friend urges a change to take place. This sincerity sets faithful friends apart from hollow ones. Therefore, friends that mutually edify each other develop an honest and priceless friendship that will outlast the majority of
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