Positive Behavior Intervention Report

1392 Words6 Pages
Models of Positive Behavior Interventions In 2003 several public schools in Marion County, Indianan piloted a discipline model called Full Purpose Partnership (FPP) (Anderson, Houser, & Howland, 2010). The FPP model was designed to integrate system of care and wraparound principles with the techniques of positive behavioral interventions and supports. Anderson, Houser, & Howland (2010), state that over the past 25 years systems of care and wraparound have been developed specifically to serve students with the most serious long-term challenges who require sustained interventions over time from multiple child-serving systems, including child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and special education. Like PBIS Full Purpose Partnership (FPP)…show more content…
Schools that once faced massive disciplinary problems are now finding more and more students striving to enhance their learning skills. All of the research points to the importance of sustainability, support, and data collection as ways to effectively implement a discipline program such as PBIS in school (Anderson et al., 2010; Cressey et at., 2015; Gonzalez, et al., 2008; Lewis et al., 2002; McIntosh et al., 2013; Safran, 2006; Stoiber & Gettinger, 2011). The unavoidable challenges teachers will face in the upcoming years are astronomical when attempting to manage challenging behaviors in the classroom, especially among younger students. Stoiber and Gettinger (2011) cite that when negative behaviors are left unaltered the behaviors may lead to significant academic, work, and social-emotional difficulties during adolescence and adulthood. In other words, when schools adopt a proactive and efficient approach to intervention, they have been able to pursue other initiatives and further improve the quality of education provided to students (Simonsen et al., 2008). The goal of implementing PBIS into schools is to establish a climate in which students perform appropriate behaviors as the norm. When teaching behavioral expectation to students the benefits of rewarding students for following those expectations is much more positive than waiting for misbehaviors to occur and using different avenues to attempt and render the negative
Open Document