Postcolonialism In Alice Walker's The Color Purple

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Slavery in America created an upsurge of racial discrimination. This demoralizing practice forced many generations of black “slave” Americans to endure, or more specifically suffer the extortions of white people. They were dehumanized as the very essential criteria for survival in society was eliminated from their lives or even from their dreams. Their identity, their self respect suffered for they were viewed as the “properties” of white people. America gradually became a powerful country but they forgot to thank the black hands whose excessive toil had built the country. In The Color Purple, the touchy as well as realistic magnum opus of Alice Walker various shades of black life have been brought into the forefront. The subordination of a…show more content…
Deeti condition was more or less formed by British colonization of India. In order to prevent her child from entering into physical and mental violence of slavery which is an offshoot of colonialism Sethe found it easier to exclude the child from her familiar world. Celie also could not find her voice in the suppressive circumstances of racism and patriarchy. So the power struggle of the “Self” enters the psychological crisis of the…show more content…
He beats her, rapes her and even impregnates her when she is only fourteen. This incident is cruel enough to shatter all joys of a girl’s life. But along with the physical torture the emotional torture was yet to come. She gives birth to a baby girl, and next a baby boy. But Pa snatches both her children and sells them. Celie did not even know that her daughter is alive. She thinks “He took it. He took it while I was sleeping. Kilt it out there in the woods.” (Walker 4). And the baby boy is sold by her Pa. Thus the mother is separated from her child unintentionally and unknowingly, with her breasts full of milk without anybody to
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