Postcolonialism In Post Colonialism

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Post-colonialism marks the end of the colonial period and the beginning of new era. People have relieved from the clutches of the colonial rule which lasted for one hundred and fifty years in the subcontinent. Post colonialism has become a very debatable topic for the postcolonial thinkers with reference to the subalterns, especially after the publication of ‘In the Words’ by Spivak (1987), ‘The Empire Writes Back’ by Aschcroft (1989), Nation and Narration (1990) by Bhabha and Culture and Imperialism by Edward Said (1993). The very first attempt goes back to Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth (1990), as he says: The first step for the colonized people in finding a voice and an identity is to reclaim their own past. For centuries, the Europeans…show more content…
Thus they share similar and intimate experience of oppression. That is why postcolonial thinkers have shared concerns with development in feminist theory. They are striving to reassert marginalized voices. Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak puts forward rhetorical and ironic question through her essay, “Can Subaltern Speak?” (1985) declares women voiceless. She has focused on the dual burdens carried out by the postcolonial female subjects; both patriarchal and imperial. Reina Lewis has observed that gender is used as metaphor for negative characterization of the orientalized others as “feminist” […]. (1996: 18). The power of colonial discourse may be assumed from how it positions women. The veil, (hijab) is the symbol of oppression and romantic simultaneously of the orient contrasted to the supposed freedom of western sexuality. These claims can be argued on the basis that the freedoms of western sexuality are such freedoms that favor hegemonic male sexuality and used to uphold the spurious notion that Muslims women are victim of an archaic patriarchal…show more content…
Mohanty in her essay, Under Western Eyes states: Feminist Scholarship and Colonial Discourses states that colonization invariably implies a relation of structural suppression and domination that is usually violent of the heterogeneity of the subjects in question. She wants to explore the production of the ‘Third World Woman’ and a ‘monolithic’ concept of male dominance which leads to the construction of a similarly reductive and homogenous idea of what I call ‘Third World Difference’: And it is in the production of this ‘Third World Difference’ that western feminism appropriate and ‘colonize’ the fundamental complexities and conflicts which characterize the lives of women of different classes, religions, cultures, races and castes in these countries (Mohanty: 1984). Substantial references needs to be quoted in the above
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