Poverty In The Bible

1986 Words8 Pages
Today, as we find ourselves in the twenty first century, our problem with poverty still exists and appears to be getting worse. Cities are continuing to grow to max capacities, hunger rings clear throughout the world, natural resources are depleted everyday due to over use, causing a degradation of our environment and billions of individuals do not claim Yahweh as their God. These are the occurrences on this planet on an everyday day cycle. There appears to be more focus on selfishness and the everyday rather than living in community with others. Plain and simple, poverty is serious and we must get to the root of it. However, Ash Barker believes we can maintain a prosperous planet once again by looking to the entire biblical narrative and…show more content…
Beginning in Job, it is evident that poverty can indeed fall turmoil on anyone (Job 19: 7-29). The reasons for poverty cannot necessarily be faulted on the poor. Following in the Psalms, the overarching idea is that God delivers all and that we should love each other in the midst (Ps. 35:1-; 82). In this, it is expected that all individuals, especially the most power who can take advantage of vulnerabilities, to practice love and justice. In the wisdom book of Proverbs, equality of humans is made clear in chapters 13 and 22. Lastly, in the book of Ecclesiastes, the benefits of honest work are highlighted. God dislikes oppression and exploitation and calls all to bask in the joys and glories of life so that life can be enjoyed to the fullest, but not at the disadvantage of others (Ecc. 5:18). By looking at these books, we are enlightened with a truth. To help the level of poverty there must be a focus in both the material and physical realms, starting with the spiritual. Here Barker effectively uses scripture to build a full spectrum framework of poverty and how alleviate…show more content…
He further gives a sound biblical basis on the definition of poverty and how to alleviate it by using biblical references to build rapport. Following, Barker delves into the Gospels by focusing more on alleviation of poverty in practical actions in everyday life. First and foremost, we must “go” (Matt. 10:17-34). That does not necessarily mean off to unfamiliar land or across the country. In many cases, it is simply acting Christ-like in the midst of everyday life—simply put, loving one’s neighbor (Mark 12:31). Further, we must sell our belongings and go to the poor. Jesus’ command here focuses on sin and “forces us to acknowledge our sin and seek restitution” (Barker, 122). We must first look to Jesus and act rather simply throw our money away. The root of this command implicates community and inclusion, making poverty and justice personal. We are not in this world for excess, but necessities. When we are left without distractions or burdens that limit us from following Jesus, then we can begin running towards the Shalom that was mentioned in the definition of poverty. When our eyes are on Jesus they are in return on other people and society becomes about benefiting others rather than ourselves
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