Comparing George Orwell's Animal Farm And The Russian Revolution

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Animal Farm and the Russian Revolution
“Power tends to corrupt and absolute power corrupts absolutely”- said Lord Acton. Throughout human history it can be seen that power and thirst for power can lead one ( it can be seen how power and thirst for it led people into) into taking immoral and unethical actions. Although most leaders start with good intentions and do not want to take a wrong turn, power has different plans for them. As George Orwell shows in his book - Animal Farm, humans are greedy by nature and would always look for their own benefits. He therefore believes that utopia is impossible since power would always lead to corruption. “Animal Farm”, although written as a an animal moral tale, has a profound and philosophical meaning when looked into deeper. The novel is an allegory story about a period in Russian history staring from the Tsar’s Russia to Stalin’s USSR. Using simple and symbolic terms, Orwell describes the development of
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He is the head of the farm and obviously represents Joseph Stalin. Napoleon at first starts with a good intention as a leader, but later into his power he becomes more power hungry and greedy. So did Stalin in Russia, when he left the real equality of socialism behind, giving himself the privilege to live a luxurious life and have all the power while the common people of the country were suffering. Napoleon, gaining much power, starts showing his true side as a dictator. In the novel he slaughter many animals who have been suspected to be against him and his rulings. Stalin, too have murdered many people who he suspected as being against him and supporters of Trotsky. As the story goes, Napoleon does not pretend to be a socialist anymore and starts ruling the country by his own laws, even changing the commandments. Although not elected by the animals he stops hiding the fact that he has become a dictator which can also be said about
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