Power In Ancient Greece

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The past is certainly a teacher for the future. It builds the footsteps for the world as we know it today. Power in the past great civilizations has set up a powerful backdrop for the development of the modern werstern world. Power is a crucial development over time that influences and defines our current civilizations. Ancient Greece had one of the most influential forms of power, philosophy, and knowledge in history. The ancient Greeks gave way to civilization in the western world as we know it today. Greece however, had different forms of power and conflict throughout it’s ancient history. Greece was not a unified empire, but is was rather made up of many separate city- states known as the Polis. The formation of these separate city-…show more content…
These two polis demonstrate the variation of power seen in ancient Greece. Sparta is well known for having had a military state with fierce warriors. While Athens is well known for having been the birthplace of democracy. The spartans had a scarcity of land and therefore set out to invade Laconia. In 730 B.C., Sparta invaded and took control of Messenia although they were a bigger and stronger city. The conquered peoples were forced to work for the Spartans as serfs called helots. The Spartans set up a military state in order to keep these conquered peoples under their control. This military state strictly controlled the lives of the Spartans. Men were trained to be warriors and were raised under strict military conduct; they lived in military barracks until they were thirty. Once they were thirty, the men could return home and were able to vote in the…show more content…
He had set out to conquer the western half of Europe and place it back into roman rule. He was able to capture and reinstall the Roman empire in Italy, some areas in Spain, North Africa, Ionia, Palestine, and Syria by 552 B.C. Only three years after the died in 565 , a tribe called the lombards invaded and took over Italy and eventually other lands as well. The Body of Civil Law were a set of coded Roman laws that were the building stones of the law in the empire and the western half of Europe until the year 1453. What Justinian achieved was groundbreaking, but it brought along consequences as well. The empire was difficult to manage since it was too large and were at a great distance from the capital of Constantinople. A lack of money in the treasury, an epidemic that wiped out a plentiful of people, and a menacing threat from bordering powers. Especially the threat of the Islamic forces who the empire eventually lost Syria and Palestine to after having been defeated in 636 at Yarmuk. At the dawn of the eighth century, the empire has shrunk and was now known as the Byzantine
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