Power In International Relations

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Power is a multifaceted concept that comes to mind whenever the security policy of a country comes into discussion. This is even more notable for the Federal Republic. Seen both as the power of Germany and Germany as a power, this concept is central to the analysis of past, current and future foreign policy decisions, and implicitly security measures. Even thought it is used in order to distill the the current foreign policy role, assumed by Germany in the late 20th century, to one single concept such as: “global economic power”, “leading European power”, “central power in Europe”, even “civilian power” or “re-emerging military power”, these mental shortcuts paint, in broad strokes, an image of the position and abilities of the German polity.…show more content…
In the context of international relations, the concept of power can be seen as the ability of one state actor to act or to influence the actions of another state or a group of states in order to fit and achieve is own interest. It can be argued that, with the complexity of the action in question, the complexity of this ability must increase also. In that case, in order to understand “power” in the international context we must take a look at its sources and later at its resources. Dahl mentions that power is actually composed of different operational concepts, but does not venture into illustrating…show more content…
There are multiple reasons why a country offers development aid, but the most pervasive and realistic is to build up the relationship with another country, or more in tone with this research to increase its power over it. By offering financial, material or expertise aid, country A creates a new situation for country B in which it has to reach certain objectives agreed upon previously by the two actors. In this case we can say that this new situation is highly dependent on the actions of A. As A controls the possibility that B will receive the reward, B’s attainment of the objectives set is dependent on his subjective probability that A will present the reward in the case of conformity to the goals minus the probability that A will offer the reward even if the agreement is broken. This is one of the main issues of development aid today, as the main reasoning for its granting is stemming more from a humanitarian point of view rather than a clear realist and strictly contractual perspective, making its withdrawal or limitation a morally costly
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