Power Theory Essay

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Introduction The Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary defines power as “the ability or opportunity to do something or to act.” (904) Power in general has both empirical and theoretical perspectives. Power is an ability that lies within one's self which one may or may not always be conscious of its existence. An individual, a small group or a community which has its own cultural identity have power in themselves in varying proportions. An individual possesses physical, intellectual, and moral power which are responsible for his/her actions and he/she exerts power over others to control or influence them. The power–physical, intellectual, and moral–that lies in an individual influences not only his actions but also has an effect on the family…show more content…
The activation of power is dependent on a person’s will, even in opposition to someone else’s.” (Sadan 35) This can be considered under the theoretical perception of personal / individual power because to my understanding, Weber is denoting that in spite of any obstruction, an individual will march towards his/her goal or aim with the self-power such as strength, confidence, and competence. Unlike Marx, he uses power more in relation to an individual rather than to the social formation. He believed in the idea of power by equating it with the ‘will…show more content…
He claims that power is “multidirectional” and is ubiquitous as it can be seen in the familial relationships, social relationships, economic relationships, and political relationships. He articulates power in terms of relations and states that “individuals are the vehicles of power, not its points of application.” (Mills 35) While Marx, emphasises the theory of power more in lieu of social structure that is the economic power of class, Foucault deals with power relations both in milieu between the social system and an individual self by struggle and
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