Prohibition Era Thesis

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The Prohibition Era, also known as the Roaring Twenties, was a time in American history when the manufacture, sale, and transportation of alcoholic beverages were prohibited. This era stemming from January 1920 to December 1933 was marked by a surge in organized crime, speakeasies, racial tensions, and bootlegging; all factors that led to the economic downfall of the U.S. shortly after. In this paper, we will discuss the historical background of the Prohibition Era, the government’s flawed structure at the time, as well as the impact it had on different groups of American society. The temperance movement, which advocated for the moderation or abstinence from alcohol, began in the 19th century. It gained momentum during the Progressive Era, …show more content…

Women who worked as prostitutes were often vulnerable and exploited, as they lacked legal protections and were subject to arrest and harassment by law enforcement. Prostitution was also often linked to organized crime, as criminal organizations saw it as a profitable enterprise that could be used to launder money and further their illicit activities. The Prohibition Era also saw a rise in "flappers," a term used to describe young women who challenged traditional gender roles and engaged in activities such as drinking and smoking. Some flappers also engaged in prostitution, seeing it as a way to challenge societal norms and assert their independence. However, the rise of flappers was also met with a backlash from conservative groups who saw their behavior as immoral and a threat to traditional values. Prostitution during this era also had an impact on public health, as the illegal and unregulated nature of the industry meant that many women were at risk of sexually transmitted infections and other health problems. Despite the risks, prostitution continued to thrive during the Prohibition Era, as speakeasies and other illegal establishments provided a steady stream of clients. While the end of prohibition in 1933 did not immediately lead to the elimination of prostitution, it did have a significant impact on …show more content…

Women were at the forefront of the temperance movement and played a key role in advocating for prohibition. They saw alcohol as a threat to the family unit, and believed that by eliminating alcohol, they could create a safer and more stable environment for themselves and their children. On the contrary, some women benefited from this time as many entered the workforce in larger numbers, as jobs became available in industries such as bootlegging and speakeasy management. Children were also affected by the Prohibition Era, as they were often caught in the crossfire of law enforcement and organized crime. Children were exposed to violence, corruption, and poverty, as their parents turned to bootlegging and other illegal activities to make ends meet. Children were also used as messengers and runners for bootleggers, putting them at risk of violence and arrest. The Prohibition Era also had unintended consequences for children's health, as unregulated alcohol production and consumption led to many polluted and hazardous

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