Propaganda In George Orwell's 'Animal Farm'

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I. Introduction (Five Sentences) A. Hook: “Death is the solution to all problems− no man, no problem.” Despite these merciless words, Joseph Stalin had millions of supporters. Although he was notorious for the labor camps and violent executions under his rule of terror, Stalin was viewed positively in the eyes of many Russians. He achieved this image and great support through the use of propaganda. B. Thesis Statement: In Animal Farm, an allegorical novella, George Orwell effectively uses the character of Squealer to portray Stalin’s use of propaganda during the Russian Revolution; in the present day, this employment of fear and card-stacking is seen in North Korea under the rule of Kim Jong Un. II. Historical Background (Seven-Ten Sentences)…show more content…
Animal Farm Connection (Seven-Ten Sentences) Topic Sentence: In Animal Farm, Napoleon quickly gains control over the animals with the assistance of Squealer, a small pig known for his persuasive speeches and propaganda techniques. A. Time and time again, Squealer threatens the animals with words of Mr. Jones’s return to the…show more content…
At the end of each speech, Squealer inquires, “‘Surely, comrades, you do not want Jones back?’” (Orwell 56). 2. Every time he faces difficulty convincing the animals that Napoleon speaks the truth, he returns to the argument that Mr. Jones, their dreaded captor, will return. Consequently, the animals immediately obey Napoleon’s orders in fear that they will face the whip of Mr. Jones if they do not follow the pigs’ rules. B. Furthermore, Squealer conceals the harsh reality of Animal Farm’s starvation with fabricated statistics and the persuasive whisk of his tail. 1. When it seems that the farm is at its lowest point, he “[reads] out the [figures, proving]… they [have] more [food]” (Orwell 113). 2. Although the initial prosperity of Animal Farm is quickly declining, Squealer distracts the animals with a skip in his step and a shrill voice, telling the animals that their home is better than ever. The pig conceals the true state of the farm, and the animals believe that Napoleon is to be credited for its false success. C. Throughout the novel, Squealer uses the animals’ fear of Mr. Jones and fraudulent, positive figures in order to rally support for Napoleon and gain power for the pigs. IV. Modern Day Connection (Seven-Ten
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