North Korea Analysis

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Thinking of a country, limiting and separating itself from the others, living in its own bubble may seem too mainstream and unrealistic. Shockingly, this country exists and keeps its presents in East Asia: North Korea. Since the ancient times, numerous compelling kingdoms occupied Korea, including China. In the late nineteenth century, Korea declared its independence and created the Korean Empire, which lasted until Japan had dominated the countries economical actions and mutated its culture in 1910. After the World War 2, Korea experienced a schism, which resulted with two hostile countries: North and South Korea. South Korea was corroborated by the US while; North Korea was validated by the Soviet Union. The influence of the Soviet Union…show more content…
In North Korea, fear has direct and indirect influences on people’s minds. Some of the most common crimes in North Korea are murder, espionage and, more relatable and associated with the topic in hand, political offenses. Criticizing the government is strictly illicit; if one commits such a crime, the punishment would be extremely harsh, including spending years in concentration camps. These camps are refuted by the government; however, there is supporting evidence that proves their existence. One can be charged with this punishment by crossing the borders of North Korea or introducing thoughts other than the ones supported by the government. The camps, or the prisons, contain severe conditions with minute amount of food access and extreme tortures to prisoners. The government refuses the theories stating that the prisons in North Korea violate the Human Rights. All of these cruel judgment policies developed a sense of fear in the society of North Korea and it basically built a strong avoidance from betraying their leader. Megan L. Gill states “This type of tightly closed environment has effectively silenced any objections reinforced through the threat of internal spying, with North Koreans, despite their acceptance of the regime, fearing the risk of imprisonment in a concentration camp. This threatening environment has made opposition to the regime near…show more content…
If one is told to hate on someone and one is highly devoted to his or her superior, he or she would be full of hostility. This is the main target under the idea of using fear for propaganda. Kim regime showed its people that Americans were pure evil and their true nemesis. People were told stories about how Americans tried to force Koreans to extinction. “The most innocent and pure” race on earth, North Koreans were and still are nurtured to hate on Americans. They show the outsiders as monsters while they are nothing but magnanimous people. This situation augments the reliability of the leader. “As such they are particularly vulnerable and, like children, need to be protected from the evil outside world. This is where the Workers’ Party, and in particular the leaders of the Kim dynasty, come in as mother-like protectors.” This “vulnerable” state of Koreans is used by the government to inject fear and also hate to its people. Especially after the World War 2 and the Korean War, in which the Americans fought against North Koreans, the government published comic books based on the conflict between North Korea and the US. The young brains were washed with these comics, showing that Americans are their archenemies. “Since then, comics have developed in various ways along with changes in society. During the Korean War (June 26, 1950-July 27, 1953), both North and South Korea used comics as a medium for
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