Proper Protection In Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird

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Proper Protection Most people think of a small town as a peaceful and quiet place, where everyone knows each other. Quarrels and disagreements rarely disrupt their tranquil lives. However, this perception could not be further from the truth in Alabama 1930’s. Like most places, Maycomb County, Alabama was full of hardworking people of integrity, as well as dishonest, indolent citizens. Atticus, a distinguished lawyer, raised his two kids, Scout and Jem, to be disciplined youth, practicing honest morals. Everyone in Maycomb admired Atticus for his respectable character, just as they all abhorred the Ewell family, for their cheating and lying ways. However, Atticus’ prominent role in town was suddenly challenged when he was chosen to defend in court Tom Robinson, a black man whom Mayella Ewell accused him of taking advantage of her. Eyes that once looked up to Atticus with deep admiration, now glared at him in disgust. In this town, the prejudiced jury refused to accept the obvious facts revealing Tom’s innocence. Nonetheless, Atticus strongly defended him, while consequently humiliating Bob Ewell and his family in the process. Enraged, Bob threatens Atticus, vowing to do him harm. Atticus, however, did not consider this a serious…show more content…
Many would argue that with Calpurnia’s faithful help and aunt Alexandra's diligent eye, along with Atticus’ presence and loyal neighbors, the Finches face no danger whatsoever. Although hated by many, Atticus’ close friends will never abandon his side. In such a small town, the dangers that seem prominent today, were miniscule matters. However, Atticus, as well as Aunt Alexandra and Calpurnia failed to keep a close guard over the children, and close friends are not always around when needed. With a greater amount of precaution, the Finch family could have live in peace and without

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