Yacht Club Proposal

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Research Proposal Yacht clubs as a building types with a detailed study of Royal St George Yacht Club in Dublin Introduction Until 1600s sailing was predominantly associated with transportation, however, in the 17th century the idea of sailing for private pleasure started to appear in the Netherlands. King Charles II of England, being in exile in the Netherlands, came across this new fascination of the local aristocracy. In 1660s he returned to England and was restored to the English crown. On his coronation he was presented with a yacht called Mary by the Dutch, which he sailed enthusiastically on the Thames. Sailing for private pleasure soon became fashionable among his courtiers, who followed his example.…show more content…
In need for premises, they applied to the Commissioner for Public Works, and were granted a piece of ground near Dun Laoghaire Harbour on which to build a clubhouse - the first privately owned building to stand on publicly owned space. Initially, the members’ main interest was in rowing, but membership grew rapidly. Soon amongst the new membership, it was possible to recognise many well-known yachtsman of the day. One of the distinguished members of the Club was the Marquis Conyngham. He was quite popular with Queen Victoria and used his influence to have the privileges of a Royal Yacht Club conferred in 1845. The Club flag was to be “the Red Ensign with a crown in the centre of the Jack” and the Burgee was red with a white cross with a crown at the centre. This, of course, is the St George’s Cross, and is quite possibly the reason why, in 1847, the Club became the Royal St George’s Yacht Club, although this has never been established. It subsequently became the Royal St George Yacht Club; it is referred to by all who know it, as simply ‘the…show more content…
The original or southern end was designed by John Skipton Mulvany and completed in 1842-3. In 1845 George Papworth doubled Mulvany’s existing building, adding new western portico and north facing apse-ended wing; after 1845 he also added the 6-column screen to south front, and steps from terrace to ground floor on north front. In 1866 Mr E.T. Owen Architect was appointed to provide an extension to be used as a smoking room on the east side of the building at a cost of £1,316. In 1963 a major restoration project was undertaken to repair and update the Club’s facilities, and this attracted a large number of new members who were ultimately to pave the way for the later developments, including a much-envied multi-purpose club room, a slate-of-the-art forecount extension for dinghies and keelboats, and a fully equipped
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