Pros And Cons Of The United States During The Progressive Era

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The United States overall during the progressive era, Gilded age, and WWI moved farther away from realizing its ideals due to various developments made regarding foreign policy and domestic issues. This is supported by various documents surrounding the actions of U.S. officials in foreign countries, and at home. The United States during this era was making small improvements towards their ideals, however the negative outcomes proved more perseverant than the positive.The United States took advantage of many war torn countries and dominated them using violent tactics and gross intimidation. Examples of this include but are not limited to; Guam, Hawaii, Cuba, and The Philippines Aguinaldo’s manifesto further perpetuates the claim that the United …show more content…

Ferguson” written in 1896 by Mr. Justice Brown grotesquely discriminated against people of color and attempted to justify it using the 14th Amendment as a loophole for blatant racism. The document was written following the civil war in the southern state of Louisiana. The southern United States still had a rather old fashioned way of thinking towards equality and was not happy with the outcome of the Civil War years after its settlements.Racism against people of color was still heavily favored because they were still viewed as inhumane, and unworthy of equal treatment. The essential basis of the document “Plessy v. Ferguson” reinstates laws concerning the accommodations of railways for “colored people” and whites. The contents of these laws included the supposed “separate but equal” accommodations of railway cars between the races and attempted to re-authorize the authority of the coaches driving these railway cars by reinstating the ability to assign people spots on railway cars “on account of the race they belong to.” Furthermore, an attempt to justify the enforced segregation bestowed upon the people of Louisiana was made following the words “neither abridges the privileges or immunities of the colored man, deprives him of his property without due process of law, nor denies him the equal protection of the laws, within the meaning of the 14th Amendment.” This statement attempts to use the 14th amendment, which …show more content…

The protest against the annexation of Hawaii was written in December of 1897 by a governed society of Native Hawaiians. The document is essentially declaring that the Islands of Hawaii do not wish under any circumstances to be annexed to the United States of America. This petition was signed by over 21,000 Native Hawaiians, which was over half of their population at the time. This document was addressed to the new, U.S. proclaimed, Republic of Hawaii, which was run by U.S. businessmen and politicians with natural resource interests. During the time that this document was written, the United States’s tension between other nations was already rising, the Spanish-American war happened only a few months after the publication of this document. This relation further demonstrates the rockiness of the relationship between the United States foreign nations during this time. This document is the People of Hawaii’s last attempt to save the bit of authority they had left before the violent takeover yet to come from U.S. officials. The petition is signed by natives of all ages, from 17 to 84. This evidence displays how opposed this political endeavor was by the inhabitants of the flourishing society the United States saw

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