Protesting In Black America

592 Words3 Pages
I have been a part of a protest before, and I know why we do them. I understand and feel the pain and suffering that black people deal with every single day here in America. Protesting is a vehicle for change if done correctly: it is considered the American way. Furthermore, civil disobedience should always be encouraged because it brings the fruits of social change as an end result. What I do not understand? Why when others disagree with what the protesters are protesting, they become so offended that they want to kill or harm the protesters? We just observed that here at Kean. We protested and the threat of violence proceeded thereafter. Is “hate” the true and indeed answer? If “hate” is not the sole explanation, it is surely part…show more content…
I am sure that his group of protesters did not feel any “oppression by the white man” as you stated. If anything, they were merely sympathizes and compassionate for the cause, so to speak. Malcolm X did support the ballot and how important Black America should get behind themselves and voting for a political party that supported and wanted to deliver change and justice for African Americans. Malcolm X really just wanted Black America to become organized and see themselves as a voting block. Malcolm X spoke of nationalism and pride for African Americans. Black America “opening their eyes” was a reality in the 60s as well as a posture for today. African Americans should be deeply involved in the political process, and we must not vote blindly for a political party. Malcolm X was right on point with that: the power of the vote is like a bullet when it is used the correct way. And as of now, the Democratic Party is doing a much better job with issues and concerns in African American communities than the Republican…show more content…
Malcolm X was preaching violence in that speech. He wanted African Americans to stand up and ensure that their vote mattered because the Democratic Party did not show support in return for their vote as a result of injustices and discriminatory practices that African Americans dealt with every single day. That speech, he delivered was about voting and Black America working together: that Black American need to force the hand of the Democratic Party immediately because there was an election down the road. Of course, Malcolm X was “fed up with white supremacy,” like many Americans were in the 60s. What he did not endorse, that Africans American should take up arms and rebel. Malcolm X preached unity and solidarity within African American communities and understanding how important the ballot was. He realized that if African Americans started holding the Democratic Party accountable for social injustices and discriminatory practices that were happening to them in the United States, the Democratic Party would not get elected. Malcolm X understood the power of voting when he spoke on April 3, 1964 in Cleveland, Ohio. Malcolm X said: “it was the black man 's vote that put the present administration in Washington,
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