Psychoanalytic Theory Of Human Personality

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Over the years, many theories have been developed to study the human personality. Some of the notable theories are psychoanalytic theory, trait theory, humanistic theory and behavioural theory. In this assignment, we have chosen to compare and contrast the psychoanalytic and humanistic theories. Psychoanalytic Theory Sigmund Freud formed the basis of psychoanalytic theories which are also known as the Freudian theories or psychodynamic theories. One of the theories that he proposed was the theories on instincts which are the life and death instinct. The life instinct is also known as the libido, which is the sexual energy that motivates us to seek pleasure while the death instinct is that human developed an unconscious desire to die which…show more content…
To the psychoanalytic theorists, humans are considered as selfish and bad from the moment we are born. They believe that the id that acts only on pleasure principle is the reason that is motivating these characteristics. Freud suggested that the id is biologically embedded in us and it is the controlling element at birth (Crossley, 2005). For example, babies are satisfied when they are breastfed and they may cry if they do not get what they want as they only want instant pleasure and to avoid pain. They also believe that the desires and wishes that are not socially acceptable and disturbing are hidden in the unconscious mind. The contents are so powerful that they are kept out of awareness (McLeod, 2009). As we grow, our parents and the society inculcate good values into us. Therefore, other parts of our personality that is the ego and superego begin to develop. (Heffner, n.d.). Hence, to adapt to the societal norms, the society is considered as a great influence on us (Lahey,…show more content…
Moreover, these both came to a point stated that the development of an individual was largely influenced by the satisfaction of personal desire and needs. Freud’s psychoanalytic theories mentioned that an individual can become psychologically healthy if all of the psychoanalytic stages of development were completed, whereas, failing to resolve successfully in any stage may cause fixation which may leads to mental abnormality. Furthermore, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs also mainly focused in the influences of satisfying human’s needs will leads to self-actualization. It can be seen that both of these theories talked about the importance of satisfying human’s needs and desires in order to prevent mental abnormalities or to achieve psychological healthiness, unlike the Erikson’s stages of development which also cover the influences of other factors, such as the parental influences, living environment and others (McLeod,
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