Psychological Effects Of The Holocaust

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The Holocaust was an altruistic event during WWII where millions of Jews were viciously murdered by the National Socialist Group under Adolf Hitler’s command. The downfall of Germany began when the Great Depression hit in the late 1920’s and the early 1930’s; The Great Depression was a time of political disaster resulting in great civil unrest. The citizens started looking for a solution. Thus the Nazi Party quickly gained popularity. Beliefs of the Nazis included creating a “master race”. The race strictly included people with blonde hair and blue eyes. Most Jewish people’s appearance did not comply with this “master race.” Hitler also blamed the Jews for the economic crisis in Germany; sadly, many people believed his untrue words. Dachau, the first concentration camp set up by the Nazis, was put into operation in March of 1933. There, medical experiments were performed on hopeless Jews. Little did the rest of the world know that this was just the beginning of the worst genocide in history.…show more content…
Ghettos were established by the Nazis in order to separate and closely maintain the Jewish population across Europe. Concentration camps were also put into operation. The Auschwitz-Birkenau camp was the most deadly, having claimed the lives of nearly 1.1 million people. In these “death camps” Jews, along with other minority groups, were imprisoned in these torturous places of death. During their sentences, the prisoners would suffer mental and physical torture that no one would ever wish to go through. They were forced to

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