Environmental Psychology

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Environmental psychology is an interdisciplinary field that focuses on the interplay between individuals and their surroundings. The field defines the term environment broadly, encompassing natural environments, social settings, built environments, learning environments, and informational environments. Since its conception, the field has been committed to the development of a discipline that is both value oriented and problem oriented, prioritizing research aimed at solving complex environmental problems in the pursuit of individual well being within a larger society. It is possible to paraphrase this definition and state that environmental psychology is the study of the relationships between behaviors and experiences of a person and his/her…show more content…
The all above mentioned definitions of environmental psychology highlight the significance of understanding this reciprocal relationship and of using this knowledge in order to be able to respond to variety of problems (Dent, 1998; Gifford, 2002). Within the framework it is also important to describe this mutual relationship more in detail and expanding the meaning of place attachment and sense of place. Thus, the study brings clarity to the issue of how people perceive, feel, sense and interact with their surrounding…show more content…
New office buildings are often claimed to deliver a more productive work space in which people work more efficiently, and a more communicative environment in which they are likely to meet one another more often. Because of these attributes, such places are said to aid staff recruitment and retention, providing a comfortable and attractive environment that appeal to the best and brightest. Similarly, new courts of justice are designed to be ‘transparent’, ‘nonthreatening’ and ‘customer-friendly’, to reveal the judicial system to all and thereby help to form a more just society. Plans for health centers and hospitals are sometimes described as welcoming, open, breaking down the barriers between doctor and patient, democratizing the health experience. By doing so they are claimed to aid health and lifestyle outcomes. As an example, it is claimed that design for Alzheimer’s disease patients can ‘facilitate mental functioning, minimize some areas of confusion, and allow individuals to function more independently’. For people in care homes, ‘places that allow residents to vicariously engage in watching on- and offsite activity will stimulate the mind and spirit.’- (The British Journal of General
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