Puritan Beliefs

1019 Words5 Pages

Puritans This title was given to the more strict and stern of the dissident Reformed Christians in England. Harried and persecuted by the royal power in the 16th and 17th centuries, they often met in secret and many moved from England to Holland to secure a measure of safety. It was from the community in Holland that some decided to seek a new home across the Atlantic and sailed on the Mayflower in 1620. In farewelling them their pastor, John Robinson, had declared that ‘’ the Lord has indeed more light and truth to break forth from his Holy Word.’’ These devout people believed it, and so they were Bible students always seeking fresh inspiration, not confined by past interpretations. They prized a simple life style and a simple worship …show more content…

There is no doubt of Cromwell’s religious faith; it was his assurance that his military career was blessed by God. Such certainty has its own dangers – the will of the party becomes the will of God. Cromwell realised this fully later in life, as when he spoke to the elders in Scotland, “”By the bowels of Christ, think it possible that you may be mistaken.’’ He could be mistaken too. By the time he became Lord Protector Cromwell was ready to be more tolerant towards Anglicans, Catholics, and even Jews. The Puritans are remembered and honoured for the deep sincerity and biblical simplicity of their faith, but regretted for their bitterness towards Christians of different …show more content…

The creation of United Churches in Canada, USA, Britain, Zambia, Madagascar, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, New Guinea, Australia and China during the twentieth century, each of them binding into one several former denominations, appears to have reached a pause, if not a full stop. Ecumenical discussion has moved towards what has been called ‘’reconciled diversity’’ as the aim. The diversity is plain, in ministry, authority structures, worship, theological emphasis, social witness and interpretation of the Bible. This diversity is precious in that it enables peoples of all sorts to find a home in a local fellowship of believers. It honours the cultural heritage and the language of every group. It respects the freedom of conscience and the breadth of the activity of the Holy Spirit. Yet the diversity also divides Christians so that each tradition or communion becomes defensive and finds it hard, or perhaps impossible, to accept others as equal members of the body of

Open Document