Quotes For King Lear

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Matthew Wong College English 11 Mrs. Jean-Paul Literary Journals January 11, 2017 Quotation One As Lear argues with Regan he says, “ Thou better know’st the offices of nature, bond of childhood, effects of courtesy, dues of gratitude. Thy half o’ th’ kingdom hast thou not forgot, wherein I thee endowed” (II.iv 201-205) As scene four commences, Lear argues with Regan over Goneril. This quote is significant because it connects to the motif family. This is because you would expect the generosity given to your children to be returned through respect. Lear reminds Regan of everything that he had bestowed to her, that she should express and act on gratitude. King Lear uses a metaphor, comparing his expectations and actions to nature. The more you…show more content…
Which I must needs call mine. Thou art a boil, A plague-sore or embossed carbuncle” (II.iv 255-258) Lear learns that his eldest daughter Goneril is not welcoming him as he thought it would be. Goneril dislikes how Lear is chaotic and immature along with his rowdy knights. King Lear, upset by her behavior, decides to move out of the castle and move with Regan instead. This connects to the motif of family and betrayal because Lear’s children are finally becoming rebellious like a regular family would experience. However, Lear’s children are destroying the desires he hopes to have in the future. In this scene, Lear uses a metaphor to describe Goneril and her actions going against his pursuit of pleasure. Lear compares Goneril to a inseparable disease that will lead him to his inevitable suffering and destruction. Lear cannot really separate from Goneril because she is related to him by blood and it is his responsibility to take care of her. Quotation Three “Fathers that wear rags, do make their children blind. But fathers that wear bags, shall see their children kind. Fortune that arrant whore, ne’er turns the key to th’ poor. But, for all this thou shalt have as many dolors for thy daughters as thou canst tell in a year” (II.iv…show more content…
King Lear discovers that his daughters are becoming uncontrollable and disrespectful, and the Fool describes the reasons why the daughters are behaving this way. This connects to the motif of family by using a juxtaposition. The fool compares the effects of raising a child that is spoiled since birth, and those who were raised without any wealth become well mannered people. This tells us that sometimes, no matter how much you love your children, it may best to provide your children with nothing so they do not become dependant on what you have. Quotation Four: “The duke be here tonight? The better, best. This weaves itself perforce into my business. My father hath set guard to take my brother.”(II.iv 14-18) Edmund learns that the Duke of Cornwall is coming to his castle, which seems to benefit Edmund’s plan and accelerate it. Shakespeare uses this soliloquy for Edmund that Edmund is willing to use anything, especially those who have more power than him to make his plans work. This connects to the motif of betrayal because Edmund is constantly scheming against his own brother in order to inherit his fortune. Quotation
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