Quotes From The Catcher In The Rye

738 Words3 Pages
”Anyway, I’m sort of glad they’ve got the atomic bomb invented. If there’s ever another war, I’m going to sit right the hell on top of it. I’ll volunteer for it, I swear to God I will”. This is a direct quote from J.D. Salinger 's novel The Catcher in the Rye. On page 141, the author is describing how his main character Holden Caulfield feels very lost and he is saying some pretty suicidal things in this quote. Over the course of the whole story the author is making this a story about a young teenage boy in the strange ages between being a child and a adult and how he feels like he doesn’t fit in with many people because “they’re too phony”. The author’s reasoning for writing the novel the way he did was because he wanted to let all the teens going through that awkward time in between the transition of becoming an adult from a child that they are not alone, no matter how lonely or lost they may feel that they can find something to relate to in Holden Caulfield and see what are the consequences of his actions and allow us to learn from them and prevent them. First, the author shows how holden thinks he is different from others such…show more content…
In conclusion the author J.D. Salinger wrote The Catcher in the Rye to help all of those teens going through the rough transitional period into adulthood, he wanted them to know that they aren’t alone and they aren’t the only ones feeling like this. Holden made the mistake of isolating himself and whenever he felt like finally turning himself in but he would change his mind much too quickly. He was very indecisive and wouldn’t plan too far into the future. If he was to have stayed at Pencey or gone straight home this story wouldn’t have been made, but then again that’s the purpose of it, to share this story and make it relatable to all teens of all different periods of time. We as teens must acknowledge that we are not grown yet, nor invincible, we must do things the right way or we’ll more than likely end up just as Holden
Open Document