Rabindranath Tagore Poem

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Gitanjali is neither a traditional book of moral preaching nor an epic. There is nothing of story interest in it. It is the voice of the religious sound going deep into the other soul. The songs of Gitanjali are like bright sweet-smelling flowers which charm everyone. They look like various flowers collected together in a basket and they smell all alone. It is too hard to draw distinction which of them is better. So, the poem certainly looks a logical structural expression of a constant theme and they look like individual work. Rabindranath Tagore has not adopted any set pattern either of thought or of composition but the song, individually, has taken total entire unity of thoughts and emotions. They are different flowers in the garland ready…show more content…
He was a poet, dramatist, actor, producer; he was a musician and a painter; he was an educationist, a practical idealist who turned his dreams into reality at Shantiniketan; he was a reformer, philosopher, prophet; he was a novelist and short-story writer, and a critic of life and literature; he even made occasional incursions into nationalist politics, although he was essentially an internationalist. ((Iyengar: 99). Rabindranath Tagore is India’s greatest genius and has been the supreme inspiration to millions of modern India. He was, in integral whole, the Rishi, the Gurudev. His fecundity and vitality were amazing -next only to Mahatma Gandhi and Sri Aurobindo. He is one of the greatest poets of the world, both from the point of view of quality and quantity. He is our Chaucer and Shakespeare; Shelley and Keats; Wordsworth and Browning; Dante and Hugo; Goethe and Tolstoy; Emerson and Whitman. The range of his verse technique will carry us from Wyatt and Surrey across Spencer, Marlowe, Dryden, Shelley and Swinburne right up to the early Ezra Pound. His ballads excel Scott 's; his child poems are more abundant than Blake’s innocence with almost sophisticated…show more content…
The publication of the English version of Gitanjali in 1913 took all Europe by storm and, at once, made Rabindranath Tagore a ‘world poet’. Ever since, it has been translated into most of the important languages of the world, Rabindranath Tagore no longer remained a poet of Bengal but became a poet of India and the world’s great poets and critics like W.B. Yeats has spoken of it in glowing terms. The award of the Nobel Prize to him is a proof of the universal recognition of Rabindranath Tagore 's poetic merit. He has also been called India’s poet laureate, ‘the sun of India’, ‘the sentinel of the East’, and ‘the bard of the East’. As stated by Prof. Iyengar, Tagore is rightly “the one writer who first gained for modern India a place on the world literary scene” ((Iyengar:
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