Race In American Society Essay

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Why is race of such major significance in American society?

Race is defined as a concept that was created by human beings in which the world is believed to be divided into biological groups that share genetically transmitted traits. This is significant to the American society because the people made up the word race, meaning race was not naturally here. The people who are discriminated, prejudice, and stereotyped are treated unfairly simply because other people with different physical traits decided to separate themselves from them. In American society today race is not just biological skin pigment color. It includes identity claim and behaviors. Race is a major significance in American society because of the importance American people put
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All minority groups in America experience this which causes them to begin to believe they are not worthy like the majority group. . The third trait membership in a minority group is generally not voluntary. This is significant people these people do not choice to be in the minority group. They are born in it. The fourth trait is minorities over time develop strong “in-group” solidarity. In group solidarity can be very problematic. This is problematic to Americans society because the minority group isolates themselves from the majority group. They also begin to feel that as minorities they are in this inequality together, in return they can start to discriminate, stereotype, and prejudice the majority group in America. This can cause war and conflict in our society today. The final trait is minorities tend to be endogamous, meaning member tend to marry other members of the group. This can be imposed by the majority as in the case of laws against miscegenation. This is also problematic to our society because people of the majority can begin to look at the minority groups as even more inferior. This is because as people we do not like people who try to be different then us. Further, this could cause more violence and radicals against both the majority and minorities in
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