Racial Segregation In Schools

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Racial segregation has been thought to be a thing of the past. However, as more and more research has been conducted, we have learned that racial segregation has just transformed. It has evolved into a laws and rules that govern how live our daily lives. Especially when it comes to public schooling. Policies like suspension and expulsion have become the go to disciplinary action for children acting up in class. But why is it that when a child acts up the first thought is to put them out of school?
In the article “A preview of Ending Zero Tolerance: The Crisis of absolute School Discipline” Derek Black talks about his book in which he tries to find the answer as to why children get kick out of school. Black stated that “once it became clear
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In Brown’s book, he was able to recount the research done by Xin Ma and Douglas Willms. Their research “found that the percentage of low-income or middle-income students in a school strongly correlated with the disciplinary climate and academic achievement in that school.” This correlation, concludes that schools that are in low-income areas are more likely to experience increased “disciplinary actions” and have lower achievement levels. Whereas, schools that are in higher income areas, that are predominately white, have lower ‘disciplinary actions” on record and have higher achievement rates. Although this problem may seem micro, it has macro level possibilities that cause problems in the black community.
Even, though the achievement gap is something that seems like a problem for only children in grade school. The developmental effects that suspensions and expulsions can have on people of color is far more critical. One theory that tries to explain this developmental effect is “Terrie Moffitt’s Dual Pathway Developmental Theory.” It says that disruptions in normal neural development that can lead to neuropsychological deficits. These deficits can lead to a life of crime. However, why is it that no one has tried to put a stop to

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