Racism In Huckleberry Finn

1000 Words4 Pages
When people read a work of literature many expect it to be a literary masterpiece. What makes a work of literature great is not through the approval of society, but by the author pushing his point out to the audience without regarding the disapproval from society he might receive. Although it is a controversial topic of whether Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn needs republishing due to the use of the word “nigger”, the novel teaches many lessons and reveals many truths that the world should know. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn should not have been republished because, simply put, it is not a racist novel. Adding on, Twain’s original publishing of his book promotes historical accuracy and legitimacy which would be not communicated…show more content…
The reason for the application of this word was not something that was meant to be racist, but originally meant to portray the racism of the time period back then and to show the struggles of living as an African. To republish The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn just to replace the n-word with various terms such as; hipster, navy seal, and slave takes away from the historical accuracy the classic novel is trying to portray. Many consider this to be “literary graffiti” and due to this readers will not be able to discern the reason why racism was so wide spread if the n-word is replaced with words such as hipster. The n-word may be used over two hundred times throughout the novel, the purpose of that is not to encourage racism today, but to convey the racial tensions that existed back in the 1840s. “No. It’s not Huckleberry Finn anymore,” Bradley an author and professor at Oregon University said. “There is a reality there that you cannot avoid.” Just as Bradley said, it’s not easy to face this word, but Twain wanted the readers to struggle with this term so that they can see the extreme prejudice that has been going on between the whites and the blacks. Without it the whole struggle that was presented behind this word will be gone if replaced. “Yeah. ‘Slave’ is a condition. I mean, anybody can be a slave. And it’s…show more content…
One of the main arguments those people bring to the table is that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is too inappropriate for younger children and should be put into recirculation with the n-word banned. Firstly, the book was not intended for the younger audiences due to its mature concepts and satire which a child probably won’t understand at their age. The book is bit too advanced for children to understand. A book about racial segregation is almost irrelevant to them as they live in a world where such things don’t exist, therefore not gaining the full underlying lessons about society and their daily attitudes in the 1840s. At most, kids would grasp the plot of the story rendering Twain’s observations
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