Racism In Huckleberry Finn Rhetorical Analysis

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Marie Herrin Mrs. Huffaker AP Language 12 January 2016 Racism in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn An issue of central importance in Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain is the controversial topic of racism. In chapter six, Twain manipulates his reader’s response to racism by controlling the speaker and surrounding circumstances of the bigoted statements in a way that pushes the reader to reject the racism because they have already rejected the speaker. In order to influence his readers, Twain utilizes the rhetorical devices of characterization and satire to show the immorality of the racist message. Through the characterization of Pap, Twain is able to express his anti-slavery views and influence them onto his readers. Twain depicts…show more content…
Yes, just as that man has got that son raised at last, and ready to go to work and begin to do suthin’ for HIM and give him a rest, the law up and goes for him. And they call THAT govment! That ain’t all, nuther.” This is ironic because it is evident that Pap did not raise Huck and he would also be a horrible role model for him if he did so. Because Pap did not benefit Huck’s upbringing in anyway, it is obvious that Twain portrays Pap as a narrow-minded character that should not be trusted. Twain clearly demonstrates bigotry though Pap’s close mindedness that is evident throughout his speech about the government. “When they told me there was a State in this country where they’d let that n----- vote, I drawed out. I says I’ll never vote again...I says to the people, why ain’t this n----- put up at auction and sold?” (Twain 20). This quote is an example of one of Pap’s commentaries that readers don’t tend to agree with. Pap’s speech creates a pattern of recognition for the audience which allows them to reject any of Pap’s beliefs, including his view on racism. Thus, when Pap talks about his opinion on racism, readers tend to disregard it as well. In addition, Twain makes an effective use of making Pap the speaker in this chapter because the way Twain characterizes Pap reinforces how readers may oppose his
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