Racism In The Book The Sneetches By Dr Seuss

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The Sneetches, by Doctor Seuss is a literary masterpiece for children of all ages. The simple and humorous book with vivid illustrations is more than meets the eye. The underlying meaning of acceptance and tolerance of peoples’ diversity is deeply encrypted into the significance of book with the plain-belly sneetches and the star-bellied sneetches. I believe the sociological concept Dr. Seuss alluded to was racism and the power of corporate America. The main conflict in the book was which group of sneetches was the best and how a particular group was excluded. Racism is the belief of one race being superior to the others, in this case, the star-bellied sneetches exercised their superiority to the plain-belly sneetches. The star-bellied…show more content…
Seuss is a harsh critique on the American culture in a children’s book. The foundation of our country on slavery and explosion of minorities, like the Native Americans and the African slaves, the prevalence of actions based on prejudice, racism, and xenophobia are extremely frequent. For example, the segregation of Black lives and Native Americans thrown on the reservations was based on racist behavior. The book could be applied to either situations or many more that have occurred or occurring now in 2016. The political, social, and ethnic diversity in our country sadly has led to a bigoted demeanor, tremendous amounts of discrimination and…show more content…
Seuss books being social and political critiques, so is The Sneetches on the topic of racism. Being an avid reader as a child, I briefly recall reading this book in a corner at Borders. Now as a young adult, Dr. Seuss books have deeper meanings and I can easily apply to various political and social movements occurring around the world such as Oaxaca, Brexit, or the Black Lives Matter social movement. Although it is a simple children’s book, most of our world leaders and corporate America must come back down to reality and make time to read this literary work because in the end, we are all humans, despite our race, ethnicity, sex, gender, or sexual orientation. The assignment brings us back to our roots with a colorful illustrations and a straight-forward message from Dr. Seuss against
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