Randy Gragg

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Randy Gragg wrote “A High-Security, Low-Risk Investment: Private Prisons Make Crime Pay” Gragg is the architecture and urban design critic for the Oregonian, Portland’s daily newspaper. Gragg has written on wars, visual art, film and performance. Randy has shifted his journalistic focus to writing on the built environment. Beyond reviewing completed projects, he has worked to build a larger constituency for better design by frequently writing about buildings and planning efforts in their generative phases when citizens and officials can still affect them through the public review process. Since moving to the Northwest from Nevada, Randy has pursued numerous writing and curatorial projects in art and design. Randy plans to spend his time as …show more content…

ITPI is committed to equipment citizens, public officials, advocacy groups, and researchers with information, ideas, and resources on best practices in government contracting and other types of public-private agreements. They help others better understand the impacts of privatization of public services and assets on democratic decision-making, public budgets, and quality public services. Lastly the Documentary Quiet Rage: the Stanford prison experiment, which was directed by Ken Musen and produced by BBC IN 1992. The phycologist who set up the experiment was Philip Zimbardo. The experiment took place at Stanford University in August of 1971 in the basement of the psychology department. The Stanford prison experiment wanted to explore the adverse effects that oppression from prison guards would have on …show more content…

them binary through the authority implied by the direct guard inmate relationship. In quiet rage, the purpose of the experiment was to show what an increase in power and status can do to a person. Essentially Zimbardo's power and authority (being the phycologist) led him to overlooking horrible situations and allowing them to take place. In fact, his own experiment even tricked him. Look at all the police brutality and all the violence in the prisons. All the participants acted out even though they knew from the beginning that it was supposed to be an experiment. At the end of the day you will end up seeing a person’s true colors whether it is an experiment or not. People are a product of their environment, experiment or not. We live this experiment every day, so what took place at Stanford shouldn't come as a surprise to anyone. We all know that the charismatic man wearing the big hat, white robe and gold ring is God, and we all know we would do anything to kiss that ring, don't fool yourselves. According to Gragg, “while it costs an average of $43.65 per day to house an inmate in Florida’s public prisons, South Bay will charge the state only $38.98” (Gragg 1). Imagine the business savvy mind of this CEO, he much rather go over capacity with the amount of prisoners that each cell can hold rather than staying with the legal fire hazard amount. This is like a domino effect that affects the guards the most. The

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