Raskolnikov's Motivation In Crime And Punishment

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Crime and Punishment introduce readers to the complicated personality and motivations of the protagonist, Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov. In the early chapters, Raskolnikov's man or woman is portrayed as a person stricken by his instances, pushed by intellectual vanity, and motivated by way of a choice to prove his exceptionalism. These aspects of his character contribute appreciably to moral obligation, guilt, and the consequences of 1's actions. From the beginning, Raskolnikov is described as a realistic and contemplative character. However, his poverty and the oppressive social situations in nineteenth-century St. Petersburg weigh closely on him. These instances shape his motivations and provide a fertile floor for his grandiose ideas. …show more content…

Dostoevsky employs strategies including introspective monologues and bright descriptions of Raskolnikov's feelings to deliver his guilt and anxiety. As Raskolnikov prepares for the homicide, his mind vacillates between confidence and self-doubt, reflecting his internal …show more content…

His encounters with his landlady, the Marmeladov circle of relatives, and his sister Dunya reveal glimpses of his compassion, which his cynicism and aloofness can often overshadow. Chapter 2: "Raskolnikov was extremely touched by this account. He could hardly restrain his tears and only just managed to prevent himself from saying something awkward." - Raskolnikov's emotional response to Marmeladov's story indicates his capacity for compassion and empathy towards those who are suffering. These interactions highlight the struggle between Raskolnikov's highbrow theories and his inherent human kindness, contributing to the complexity of his

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