Ratification Of The Constitution Dbq Essay

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In the late 1770s, the Constitution caused much controversy and pitted the Federalists and Anti-Federalists against each other even further (“Brief History”). The Constitution created a stronger central government and weaker state governments which Anti-Federalists were not in favor of. (“Brief History”). The Constitution also included three branches of government: executive, judiciary, and legislative and included checks and balances. The new constitution caused many to speak out in opposition and for it and among those people were James Madison and Mercy Otis Warren. Madison was for the constitution and Warren was against it. There was differences and the similarity of liberties between James Madison and Mery Otis Warrens arguments. Amongst …show more content…

What motivated her was her belief that the Constitution took away their rights. In her argument she believed that the constitution weakened their liberties and that the Constitution would take away those liberties and that they gained after taking their power back from Britain and she makes this clear when she says that the constitution, “threaten to sweep away the rights for which the brave sons of America have fought with an heroism” (Warren, 156). Warren overall believed that the ratification of the Constitution went against what they worked …show more content…

Madison states that the “The two great points of difference, between a democracy and a republic, are, first, the delegation of the government, in the latter, to a small number of citizens elected by the rest; secondly, the greater number of citizens, and greater sphere of country, over which the latter may be extended” (Madison, 154). Madison throughout the Federalist 10 papers mentions that he prefers a republic, where this is less representation. Warren believed that the representation proposed by the Constitution was insufficient. She mentions this in her eleventh reason, stating that “one representative to thirty thousand inhabitants is a very inadequate representation...interfering with any regulations for the time, places, and manner of choosing our own representatives” (Warren, 158). Because Mercy Warren preferred a stronger state government, she doesn’t feel as though the representation would represent well enough what they need and would give them less liberty to choose their

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